Holiday food

Holiday food

Every culture has holiday food or food for special days.  Koreans eat a sweet red bean soup on the shortest day of the year, rice cake soup for new years and chicken soup in the heat of summer. We have lots of holiday food traditions in Canada too; eggs for Easter, pumpkin pie for Thanksgiving and turkey at Christmas. In our family, all the “sit-down holiday meals” like Thanksgiving, Easter and Christmas pretty much look the same: turkey, mashed potatoes and brussel sprouts.

My yobo has lived in Canada for 13 years now so we don’t have too many cultural misunderstandings anymore so it surprised me when he accused me of not liking brussel sprouts!

I love holiday meals but I don’t usually cook up a turkey any other time of the year or make brussel sprouts for a Thursday dinner.  That said, I have never been served red bean soup on a Friday in June either.

My mom is a fabulous cook and this year again she hosted a wonderful meal including a killer brussel sprout recipe!  I’ll get her to guest post about it some time… maybe at Easter time.

*This conversation actually happened at Thanksgiving, but since the menus for both meals were the same, I used some creative license to change the date! 🙂


My toughest critic

Blopblah!

Nyles is two and has very little words.  Most of his words are made up sounds that only his immediate family understands the meaning of.  The meaning of this ‘word’, however, is pretty obvious!

Nyles really isn’t a picky eater, he just takes a while to decide he is going to try something, and when he does (mostly because if he doesn’t, he doesn’t get dessert), he likes it!

The Korea daily – Vancouver edition

We made the newspaper! The Joongang daily did a special report on my little blog and my cooking adventures for a feature on Koreans overseas!

Chosun Ilbo

So what does it say? (for all the non Koreans).  It explains about my blog and how and what I like to cook with my 4 (gasp!) kids.  The report also shares that I also like to cook for others and have taught people how to cook Korean food. I’m called a “Korea-mania”.

Welcome to new readers who found this space thanks to the report! And thanks Sophy for interviewing me! 🙂

Canadian?

Canadian

Kyah’s response to this answer of mine: How can I be 200% Mom?!?

I find this a tricky question to answer.  The kids are all born in Canada and are Canadian.  I am also born in Canada but my parents are both from Holland but Canadian citizens.  The kids Apa is Korean and not a Canadian citizen.

How would you answer this?

Korean bazaar

My favourite day?  Korean bazaar Saturday at the local Korean church!  Here is why… street food!  It is also a great opportunity to practice my Korean.  It always impresses them when I can barter in Korean.

spicy pork pancake

The Korean ladies from the church work hard and cook up a storm, like this yummy spicy pork pancake!

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bazaar

We scored the very last bag of homemade kimchi from the fabulous Kimchi-Ajumma!

kimchi

I figure the lady that makes the best kimchi in the church is the one who is asked to make it for the sale so it is going to be delicious!

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The kids devoured their tornado potato! Interesting fact: did you know these were invented in Korea?  No, really, they were! 🙂

They also had kimbap… but it was gone before I could get my camera out!

My yobo enjoys the garage sale portion of the bazaar.  This is where we got our Korean bible verse last year.  Unfortunately for my yobo, he hardly got to buy anything, I spent all our money on Korean food. Next year…

Do you love Korean street food?  I’ll give you a heads up next year when the bazaar is happening and you can join us there!

Bacon

Bacon comic

I had to explain to Taron that this is not how we get bacon from pigs.  He couldn’t believe that farmers killed their pigs to get the bacon.  “Then how will they get more bacon?” he asked.

He still doesn’t totally get it.  The other day he was explaining to a friend that “pigs lay bacon two times then the farmer has to kill them.” 🙂