How to make kimbap – graphic

Kimbap how-to graphic

Here it is!  For those visual learners, who like to see how to do things, a how-to graphic!

I’ve been wanting to make this for a long time.  Whenever I post a yummy kimbap recipe, I have thought that it would be really handy to have something like this to attach so people could easily see the steps.  I hope this helps.

And if this has inspired you to make kimbap, here are a few fabulous variations to try:

kimbap rolls Kimbap

cucumber rolls Naked cucumber rolls

Nov 2014 011 Sweet and spicy Tuna kimbap

tuna kimbapTuna kimbap

salmon kimbapSmoked salmon kimbap

 

 


Sweet and spicy tuna rolls – chamchi kimbap

sweet and spicy tuna rolls

These sweet and spicy tuna rolls are quick and easy but oh so yummy!  Rolled up seaweed in or seaweed out, they make a great appetizer or a light lunch.

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The kids are in swimming lessons on Friday nights.  It was a great concept, in theory; end the week with lessons and a swim at the pool.  My yobo joins us and swims with the kids.  It sounds lovely.  And it is, except that dinner still needs to be made, my yobo can’t always make it there and it is 6:30 when we get home!  If I am organized, I have dinner planned before we go, but more often than not, I am throwing it together when we get home.  This week’s throw together menu… sweet and spicy tuna rolls and zucchini pancakes!

sweet and spicy tuna rolls

“You are crazy!” you are thinking. No, really, they are that easy. 🙂

Sweet and spicy tuna rolls

Sweet and spicy tuna rolls

Ingredients

  • 3 cups of cooked medium grain rice
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 4 sheets of seaweed for sushi (nori)
  • 1 can of tuna
  • 2 tbsp sweet chilli sauce
  • sesame seeds to garnish

Instructions

  1. Mix the sesame oil and the salt into the warm cooked rice
  2. Add the sweet chilli sauce to the drained tuna
  3. Place 3/4 c rice on the top 2/3 of the seaweed
  4. Spread out evenly
  5. Add 1/4 of the tuna mixture to the end of the rice
  6. Roll the rice/seaweed over the tuna to cover it - squeeze tightly
  7. Continue to roll
  8. Glue the end of the roll with a few grains of rice
  9. Squeeze, slice and enjoy with soy sauce!
http://koreainmykitchen.com/?p=1360

Note: to make the ‘inside-out” rolls, you need 4 cups of rice and instructions for reverse rolling are here! 🙂

Korean bazaar

My favourite day?  Korean bazaar Saturday at the local Korean church!  Here is why… street food!  It is also a great opportunity to practice my Korean.  It always impresses them when I can barter in Korean.

spicy pork pancake

The Korean ladies from the church work hard and cook up a storm, like this yummy spicy pork pancake!

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bazaar

We scored the very last bag of homemade kimchi from the fabulous Kimchi-Ajumma!

kimchi

I figure the lady that makes the best kimchi in the church is the one who is asked to make it for the sale so it is going to be delicious!

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The kids devoured their tornado potato! Interesting fact: did you know these were invented in Korea?  No, really, they were! 🙂

They also had kimbap… but it was gone before I could get my camera out!

My yobo enjoys the garage sale portion of the bazaar.  This is where we got our Korean bible verse last year.  Unfortunately for my yobo, he hardly got to buy anything, I spent all our money on Korean food. Next year…

Do you love Korean street food?  I’ll give you a heads up next year when the bazaar is happening and you can join us there!

Street food in Korea (and China)

I love street food.  One of the reasons I was so excited to go back to Korea, besides visiting family and showing the kids their father’s homeland, was to eat lots and lots of street food… and we did!

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This is a typical food stand in Seoul.  You can enjoy kimbap, spicy rice cakes and all kinds of deep fried yumminess here.

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Glass noodles wrapped in seaweed, dipped in batter and deep fried… YUM!

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This is us enjoying our first ‘meal’ in Korea.

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The kids ate lots and lots of kimbap!

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I really like pancakes and I was obsessed with eating hoddeok, pancakes stuffed with sugar and nuts, everyday!

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We also discovered a savoury pancake sold on the streets that was stuffed with noodles and veggies.  We had to try those as well!

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Yummy! (We did need to take our street food indoors this day as it was cold and rainy.)

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We also had fabulous street food in Shanghai.  We enjoyed some yummy onion pancakes…

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and bbq’ed squid, of course!

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The kids got to try sugar cane for the first time.

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My brother ordered us Chinese-style shawarma that were delicious!

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Nothing beats eating on the street with cousins!

We also ate lots of different foods on a stick – bbq’ed chicken, deep fried chicken, and sausages to name a few. Unfortunately I forgot to take pictures 🙁 Now to try and make a few of these myself.

Korean cooking class

cooking class

I am a teacher so I know how to teach.  And I like to cook, but can I teach how to cook?

Well, that is what I did this weekend.  I was invited to teach a fabulous group of ladies some Korean recipes.  The host had a gorgeous kitchen for cooking and teaching and graciously worked as my assistant fetching all sorts of ingredients and utensils.  The ladies were excellent students, trying, learning and asking lots of questions.  Good food and good times were enjoyed by all!

What was on the lesson plan? First up, kimbap, rice rolls. I demonstrated the simple art of rolling them so they each look like a little masterpiece! 🙂

kimbap rolls

Secondly, we made our own pork mushroom mandu, dumplings, folding up little pockets of goodness!

Pork mushroom mandu

And finally, we enjoyed some Korean bbq’ed beef, bulgogi in lettuce wraps.

lettuce wrap

Sorry, no glamour shots of these. This was the last piece of meat that was about to be devoured when we snatched it from a hungry mouth in order to snap a picture. Even though bulgogi is probably the most well know Korean dish, I have yet to post a recipe for the marinade.  Soon… I promise! 🙂

cooking class 2

Tuna kimbap

tuna kimbap

A wonderful combination of veggies and protein wrapped up in sesame flavoured rice and roasted seaweed.  A well balanced bite with all the food groups represented! Think of it as a mini little food pyramid …. in a circle! 🙂

My yobo was really wanting kimbap and has been asking me to make it for weeks now (read: begging!)  So one Sunday night he decides to make rice (waaaay) to much of it and I have to figure out what to make with all this rice.  Kimbap, he suggests.  He even produces all the necessary ingredients. Not so subtle! So kimbap it was!

This rendition has a yummy flavoured tuna in it. When a lady was offering samples of it at the grocery store, my yobo and all the kids went back twice.  I had no choice but to buy it, more because I felt bad for the sample lady than the fact they all enjoyed it! It also has spinach, a favourite of my yobos; “just like my mom makes it!”

The things you need:

  • A package of roasted seaweed 10 pieces
  • 8 cups cooked white sticky rice (don’t know how? here!)
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil
  • 1/2 tsp salt (to taste)
  • A package of spinach
  • 2 carrots
  • 4 eggs
  • 2 cans tuna (sun-dried tomato flavoured)
  • Korean pickled radish

sundried tomato tunaradish

The prep:

  • Add sesame oil and salt to slightly cooled cooked rice.
  • Beat the egg and fry like a crepe. Cut into 10 long pieces.
  • Slice the Korean pickled radish into 10 long pieces.
  • Slice the carrot into 10 long pieces.  Lightly fry.
  • Slice the cucumber into 10 long pieces using the outside of the cucumber and discarding the column of seeds in the middle.
  • Blanche the spinach in boiling water for 1 min.  Drain and squeeze. Lightly season with salt or soy sauce.

Assembly

  • Lay the seaweed on a bamboo roller
  • Place 3/4c + a little bit of rice on the seaweed
  • Spread the rice out evenly over 2/3 of the seaweed
  • Place the ingredients at the bottom end of the rice
  • Carefully roll the seaweed over the ingredients and pinch it tightly
  • Roll the rest of seaweed up nice and tight
  • Glue the end to the roll with a few pieces of rice
  • Cut with a sharp knife
  • Enjoy!

For a step-by-step picture tutorial on how to roll kimbap, see here! 🙂

 

 

 

Yawna kimbap – Smoked salmon rolls

salmon kimbap

A delicious combination of smoked salmon, yellow radish, cucumber and avocado rolled up in a sesame flavoured rice roll.

I was going through the fridge looking for some inspiration and lo and behold I found all the ingredients for a fabulous kimbap! My brother-in-law had smoked me some salmon, my mom had given me avocados before they left on a trip and I always have yellow Korean radish and cucumber on hand. Lucky for my yobo, since if I ever ask what he wants for dinner he always says “kimbap!”

Now you might be thinking, “aren’t these sushi rolls?”  They obviously are very similar with a few distinct differences. One of them being the seasoning for the rice; kimbap utilizes sesame oil and salt to flavour the rice while Japanese rolls use sushi vinegar. Another distinction is the ingredients; kimbap tends to have more ‘stuff’ in them and they usually include of pickled yellow radish.  I must admit though that the avocado is not very authentically Korean 🙂

So if you haven’t given kimbap a try, here is your chance!

salmon kimbap

Yield: 10 rolls

The things you need:

  • 8 cups cooked sticky rice (4 cups uncooked = 8 cups cooked)
  • a package of kim, seaweed or nori sheets (10 pieces) I just buy what is on sale.  I am not too picky!
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 a cucumber
  • Korean pickled yellow radish (see pic… available at Asian markets)
  • 1 avocado
  • 1 fillet of smoked salmon

The prep:

  • cook the rice.  I used 2 cups white and 1 cup brown this time (trying to be healthy!)  For a step by step on rice, see here
  • once the rice is made, allow it to cool for a few minutes, add the sesame oil and salt and mix well
  • cut the radish into 10 long thin pieces (6 inches)
  • cut the cucumber into 4 long pieces (6 inches), give the column of seeds to one of your helpers to gnaw on and slice the outside chunks into 10 long pieces
  • peel the avocado, take out the seed and slice thinly
  • break the salmon fillet into smallish pieces

cucumberradishcut radishavocadosalmonkim

The assembly:

  • put the sheet of kim, seaweed, on a bamboo roller
  • scoop 3/4c + a little smidge rice onto the seaweed
  • nicely spread out the rice on the top 2/3 of the seaweed
  • place the ingredients on the bottom end of the rice
  • carefully make one roll from the rice side to cover the ingredients and pinch it nice and tight
  • roll the roll over the rest of the seaweed nice and tight
  • take a few little grains of rice to act as glue and place them on the loose end of the seaweed and squeeze roll tightly
  • let the roll sit a few minutes before cutting
  • cut with a sharp clean knife into small bite size pieces (this way it looks like more and you can eat it gracefully!)

kimkim and ricesalmon kimbapsalmon kimbap 2rice gluesalmon roll

kyah and nyles

Kimbap kids in the kitchen!

If you like rolls, check out these:

cucumber rolls kimbap rolls

Naked cucumber rolls      Kimbap

Nachae kimbap – Naked cucumber rolls

cucumber rolls

A favourite with kids and adults alike, these easy rolls look extra fancy with the rice on the outside!

Now you might be wondering about the name (a little risque, I must say!) My yobo says they are called ‘naked’ kimbap in Korea since you can’t see the seaweed on the outside.  Personally, I always think of them as ‘inside-out’, like they have their shirts on inside out.

Since you taste the rice first and the crunch of the cucumber, if you have someone in your life (or maybe even you) who is leery to try rice rolls because of the texture or taste of the seaweed, naked kimbap is a great introduction.

Yield: 4 rolls of nachae kimbap

The time you need: prep: 20 mins (for rice to cook) rolling: 10 mins

The things you need: (to make 4 rolls)

  • 2 cups of rice (4 cups cooked rice).
  • 4 sheets of kim (seaweed)
  • 1/2 a cucumber
  • 1/2 tbsp sesame oil
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • sesame seeds to garnish

The prep:

  • make the rice. For a great tutorial on how to sticky rice, click here
  • once the rice is cooked, let the rice cool slightly and add the sesame oil and salt
  • cut the cucumber into really thin long pieces discarding the seeds (they just make things watery!)

The assembly:

  • lay the seaweed, kim, on a bamboo roller.  (If you don’t have one, don’t stress.  I just find it does make it easier but they can be made without one.)
  • scoop 1 cup of rice on the seaweed
  • spread it out evenly covering the entire piece of seaweed
  • flatten and smooth it out with the spatula
  • IMPORTANT STEP: cover the rice with a piece of saran wrap and flip it over so the seaweed is facing up! (You may have seen this being done at a sushi restaurant. I have tried to do it without the saran wrap and it was a sticky mess! 🙂 )
  • layer 1/4 of the cucumbers at the top of the rice
  • carefully make a roll over the cucumbers  (Be sure to not roll the saran wrap along with it…. not that I know from experience!)
  • continue to roll the nice and tight. When it is all rolled, use the saran wrap and the bamboo roller to give it a tight squeeze
  • allow the roll to rest a few minutes (while you roll the other ones) and cut with a sharp knife
  • arrange, garnish with sesame seeds and pat yourself on the back!

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Enjoy!

Kimbap – Korean rolls

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Kimbap, Korean rice rolls, are a wonderful medley of vegetables, egg, radish and meat tightly wrapped in sesame rice and seaweed.

This recipe is one my yobo’s mom taught me to make when I lived in Korea.  My mother-in-law is a great cook and an amazing woman. Knowing how much I liked kimbap, every time we came to visit, she would prepare them.  She then patiently taught me how to cook despite my limited Korean language ability.  Using lots of hand gestures, simple Korean and some help from my yobo, I learned how to make these classic Korean rolls. There are many variations of kimbap but this is a basic version that my yobo grew up on.

Kimbap is picnic food or a great snack in Korea.  In my opinion, it is too time consuming for a snack. When I make 10 rolls of it, it is dinner! And a yummy dinner at that.

Yield: 10 rolls of kimbap

The time you need:  prep: 30 mins    rolling: 15 mins (depending how fast you are!)

The things you need:

  • a package of kim, seaweed, or nori sheets (10 pieces)
  • 4 cups white sticky rice (8 cups prepared)
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil
  • 1/2 tsp salt (to taste… add more if you like it more salty)
  • Korean pickled radish – see picture
  • 1 cucumber
  • 2 carrots
  • 4 eggs
  • a package of lunch ham (or you can buy a ham steak and cut it up)

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The prep:

  • make the rice.  For directions, see this post by Kyah – bap
  • when the rice is made, allow it to cool slightly and add the sesame oil and salt.  Mix well.
  • beat the egg and fry on medium low like a crepe.  Flip when browned and cool. Cut into 10 long thin pieces
  • slice the carrots into 10 long thin pieces (6 inches long)
  • slice the radish into 10 long thin pieces (6 inches) or you can buy the package that is pre-sliced for you
  • cut the sides of the cucumber into 4 long pieces from the outside.  Discard the column of seeds. Cut the long pieces into 10 thin pieces each having some green on it – if this is confusing…see the picture 🙂
  • cut the ham into 2 halves
  • lightly fry the carrot in the fry pan used from the egg till it is browned and  lightly salt.

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The assembly:

  • lay the seaweed, kim, on a bamboo roller
  • scoop 3/4c + a little bit of rice onto the seaweed
  • spread out the rice evenly on the top 2/3 of the seaweed
  • use the spatula to spread and smooth out the rice
  • layer the ingredients at the bottom end of the rice
  • then carefully roll the seaweed like a jelly roll – if you know how to roll a jelly roll 🙂 – first pinching the top of the seaweed over the ingredients and then carefully rolling the rest nice and tight
  • use a little bit of rice at the end to ‘glue’ the seaweed to the roll
  • squeeze the roll tightly
  • allow the roll to rest a few minutes before cutting
  • cut with a sharp knife.  I find it helps to clean the knife between rolls or else it gets all goopy from the rice.

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Nothing beats making kimbap in the sunshine!